Ethnic segregation levels in the Belfast urban area
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Ethnic segregation levels in the Belfast urban area

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Published in UK .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesArea -- v.21, no.2
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19695598M

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, taken during the recent "Troubles," a strongly rising level of ethnic segregation is noted for the s, followed by a more gentle rise in the os. Segregation is shown to vary among subunits of the urban area. The basic cause of this segregation is ethnic violence, and the spa-.   The segregation of Catholics and Protestants varies spatially and temporally in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Using small‐area statistics from the censuses of , , and , taken during the recent “Troubles,” a strongly rising level of ethnic segregation is noted for the s, followed by a more gentle rise in the by: ETHNIC RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION IN BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND, – * Dr. PAUL DOHERTY. D r. D oherty is a lecturer in history, philosophy, and politics at the University of Ulster, Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland BT37 for more papers by this by: to this overall increase was an even sharper jump in segregation levels inpublic sector housing (from 64 to 92) (Figure 1). That component of the housing `market’ supposedly open to central management clearly underwent a dramatic process of ethnic separation. Second, let us look at an area of inner Belfast where segregation levels were.

The highest level of segregation, with the exception of some peripheral new-build areas outside the Stop Line, is in Belfast West. High levels are also found in the LGDs of Lisburn and Castlereagh. Both Lisburn and Newtownabbey have experienced population growth and a strong increase in segregation, but while Lisburn has become more Catholic. Paul Doherty (in Social Contrasts in a divided city () Geographical Perspectives on the Belfast Region, Geographical Society of Ireland) examined levels of segregation in Belfast, using 1 kilometer grid squares as a basis for his analysis. He found that, of the square kilometers of the city, in only 10 were more than 90% Catholic. In Belfast, the s were a time of rising residential segregation. It was estimated in that % of public housing in Northern Ireland was divided along religious lines, with the figure rising to 98% in Belfast. Self-segregation is a continuing process, despite the Northern Ireland peace process. These populations are, as we have seen, very segregated. The levels of segregation seem to vary over time. In the mid 19th Century about 50% of the population was estimated to live in segregated streets – about 50% lived in mixed streets. During times of inter-ethnic tension segregation levels rise.

  McPeake, J, , “Religion and residential search behaviour in the Belfast urban area” Urban Studies 13 – Google Scholar Martin, D, Dorling, D, Mitchell, R, , “Linking censuses through time: Problems and solutions” Area 34 82 –   In Belfast, the s were a time of rising residential segregation. [11] It was estimated in that % of public housing in Northern Ireland was divided along religious lines, with the figure rising to 98% in Belfast. [1] Self-segregation is a continuing process, despite the . residential segregation, with the neighborhood segregation index rising from 56 to 78 between and , a remarkable increase of 39 percent in just three decades. The combination of growing urban Black populations and higher levels of segregation could only produce one possible outcome—higher levels of Black isolation. In , the. Desegregating the City takes a global, multidisciplinary look at segregation and the strengths and weaknesses of different antisegregation strategies in the United States and other developed countries. In contrast to previous works focusing exclusively on racial ghettos (products of coercion), this book also discusses ethnic enclaves (products of choice) in cities like Belfast, Toronto.